tart

I wouldn’t be terribly surprised if you guys were under the impression that I never eat vegetables.  I know I don’t blog about them very often, but it’s not because I’m not cooking them.  It’s just that most of the time the things I’m eating aren’t very blog worthy.  Roasting is my go-to preparation for veggies; I’ll roast just about anything – asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, squash, parsnips, beets, etc.  I love the simplicity, and the way the vegetables caramelize in the oven.  I just don’t feel compelled to blog about them when there are so many other things to share!  So, rest assured, I don’t exist purely on chocolate and cake, even if it seems that way sometimes :)          

tart

Brace yourselves, though, because today is all about vegetables.  I came across this tart as I was flipping through a recent issue of Fine Cooking, and the combination of sweet potatoes, chard, red onions and feta sounded too good to pass up.  The onions are caramelized and glazed with balsamic vinegar, the sweet potatoes are simply roasted, and the chard is cooked just until wilted then also glazed with balsamic vinegar.  The filling is bright and fresh, just a touch sweet and complemented perfectly by the slightly salty feta.  It’s hearty too – one slice of this tart was a really satisfying lunch for me.     

tart

I spread the preparation of the tart out over the course of an afternoon to make it less overwhelming because there are quite a few steps.  I also baked the tart crust using the teff flour suggested by the recipe.  I’d never used it before, but I found a bag at Whole Foods and figured I’d give it a try.  I loved the nutty flavor and darker color it imparted to the crust so I’m glad did!  That said, if you didn’t want to buy the teff flour, I don’t see any reason you couldn’t just substitute whole wheat flour in its place.  I will caution that I had a bit of trouble rolling out the crust – there was definitely a lot of patching involved.  I may try pressing it into the pan next time instead of rolling. 

Picnik collage

As written, this recipe makes an 11-inch tart, but I halved it and used an 8-inch pan.  Aside from that change, I made the recipe exactly as written so I’m just going to link to it on Fine Cooking’s site here.