Truffles

This week’s Sweet Melissa Sundays was chosen by Nina of Nina’s Cupcakes: rum truffles.  If you’ve never made truffles, you’ll be surprised by just how easy they are to whip up.  They tend to be pretty expensive to buy (at least the good ones anyway) so making them at home is not only cheaper, but you can customize them to suit your tastes.  There’s nothing worse than the boxes that leave you guessing about the flavors so you wind up having to bite into 4 or 5 before you find one you like :)

Truffles

Most of the truffle recipes I’ve made rely on a combination of chocolate and cream for the base of the truffle, but this one was a bit different.  No heavy cream – instead we used butter and egg yolks along with the chocolate.  I was skeptical about the egg yolks (presumably they add richness), but no harm in trying once I figured.  The final ingredient in these truffles is dark rum.  The full recipe made 4 dozen truffles, which is way too many for us, so I made 1/8 of the recipe and wound up with 6 truffles (I used my melon baller to scoop them so they were fairly small).  A lot of people swear by rolling their truffles in cocoa powder, but I tried it once and to put it mildly, Shane wasn’t a fan.  So, I didn’t make that mistake again; instead, I rolled my truffles in chocolate sprinkles and confectioners’ sugar.  

Truffles

Truffles are the ultimate in decadence, and these were no exception – very rich and chocolate-y, half a truffle was plenty for me!  I liked that the rum wasn’t overpowering in this recipe.  As for the egg yolk?  Completely undetectable, thankfully :)  I may actually prefer this butter/egg yolk variation over the heavy cream version.  Thanks to Nina for hosting this week.  She’ll share the recipe on her site today, or you can find it on page 217 of The Sweet Melissa Baking Book

Truffles

While I made the truffles I was also working on lunch.  It was a salmon recipe I was really excited about but sadly, it was a major fail.  The salmon turned out dry, and the accompanying sauce was bitter.  I hate wasting food so recipe failures always bum me out, but luckily that wasn’t a problem as Shane claimed to like the salmon and ate his plus a good portion of mine.  I was talking to a few friends on Twitter about the fail, and it started a discussion about whether we blog recipes that don’t turn out well.  Personally, I won’t blog a recipe that fails (recipes made for blog groups being an exception to this rule) unless I know exactly what went wrong and can offer suggestions for improving the recipe.  Now, I’m curious – if you have a blog, what do you do about recipes that don’t turn out well?  Do you only blog what you love?